Proving the Business Case for the Internet of Things

Connected Health Newsletter Archives: April 2019

 
Microsoft and wearables help doctors tackle COPD




By using wearable devices and Microsoft’s Azure cloud platform, doctors are using technology to help patients with a serious lung disease get treatment in their homes.
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Wearables pilot monitors people with Parkinson’s




People with Parkinson’s could see their care transformed thanks to a pilot involving wearable technology from Australian company Global Kinetics.
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Libelium IoT network protects children from asthma




Russian smart city company Airalab is using an IoT sensor network and blockchain to prevent asthma attacks in children by monitoring air quality conditions in play areas. The technology comes from Spanish firm Libelium.
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Xtrava launches autonomous baby monitor




Silicon Valley start-up Xtrava has announced what it claims is the world's first autonomous baby monitor. Called Butterfly, it tracks breathing, sleep patterns, diaper wetness and daily activities and is available for pre-order.
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Sweati demonstrates threefold potential of sweat wearable




UK wearable patch start-up Sweati, in collaboration with research partner Imperial College London, has demonstrated that it is possible to measure continuously concentrations of glucose, lactate and hydration using multiple ions in sweat.
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Canadian hospital takes digital route to patient care




A hospital under construction in Canada and set to open late next year will use digital technology to deliver personalised health support, helping patients understand their condition, learn about medications, control their environment, prepare for discharge and more.
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IoT-enabled medical devices market to grow at 30% CAGR

The market for IoT-enabled medical devices reached a value of nearly $18.8bn in 2018, having grown at a CAGR of 8.6% from 2014, and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 29.9% to nearly $69.7bn by 2023, according to Research & Markets.
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Siemens opens health innovation lab in South Carolina




The University of South Carolina has opened its Innovation Think Tank Lab in downtown Columbia in collaboration with German medical technology company Siemens Healthineers.
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Researchers develop toilet seat that monitors heart condition




Researchers at New York’s Rochester Institute of Technology are hoping to get to the bottom of heart rate monitoring with a toilet seat-based cardiovascular monitoring system that could help hospitals check patients at risk of congestive heart failure.
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Deutsche Telekom explains digitalisation plan for German healthcare




Adel Al-Saleh (pictured), a member of the Deutsche Telekom board of management and CEO of T-Systems on digitalisation in healthcare, explains the roll-out of healthcare digitalisation services in Germany.
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Tunstall takes Essence to Canadian seniors




Israel-based Essence, an IoT-enabled independent living company for seniors, is working with Dutch company Tunstall Healthcare’s Canadian subsidiary to offer the Pers personal emergency response systems and home care to seniors.
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Sutter Heath pilots Suki AI digital assistant




The not-for-profit Sutter Health network is teaming up with start-up Suki to pilot an artificial intelligence-powered, voice-enabled digital assistant with doctors in northern California.
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ForaCare provides remote diabetes monitoring




A diabetes monitoring system from California-based ForaCare can be used for remote patient monitoring. The Fora GTel multi-functional monitoring system has built-in cellular connectivity.
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Prototype wearable could detect cancer in blood




Engineers and doctors at the University of Michigan have developed a prototype wearable device that can continuously collect live cancer cells directly from a patient’s blood. Tested in animal models, it could help doctors diagnose and treat cancer more effectively.
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