Proving the Business Case for the Internet of Things

New Zealand government establishes Smart Grid Forum

Iain Morris
March 25, 2014

New Zealand’s government has set up a new Smart Grid Forum charged with advancing the deployment of smart electricity networks in the country.

In a statement, energy and resources minister Simon Bridges said that New Zealand needed to develop smarter electricity systems in future to cope with demand for emerging technologies as well as changing consumer preferences.

“The new Smart Grid Forum will provide a platform for information-sharing about these new challenges and opportunities, as well as providing advice on the deployment of a smart grid in New Zealand,” he said.

“It reflects the government’s commitment to the responsible and savvy use of resources and technology to secure New Zealand’s energy future and lift our standard of living,” he added.

Bridges said the government had invited prospective forum members to register their interest in the initiative, deciding to proceed with it on the basis of the “significant response” to that invitation.

According to the government’s statement, members have been chosen based on a range of criteria, including the need to represent leaders from across all parts of the electricity system, including consumers, business, scientific and academic interests.

“I’d like to thank those who put their hand up and I look forward to the contribution they will make in helping to shape a common vision for our future power system,” said Bridges.
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