Proving the Business Case for the Internet of Things

Itron to supply France's GrDF in major smart gas meter project

Iain Morris
March 1, 2014

Smart-meter developer Itron says it has been chosen by France’s GrDF to provide 3.7 million smart gas meters in what represents one of the world’s largest deployments by a gas utility.

The meters will be rolled out as part of GrDF’s (Paris, France) smart gas meter project, through which it is aiming to reduce costs and improve the service it provides to customers.

GrDF also believes the smart-meter deployment will create new jobs within the sector.

Itron (Liberty Lake, WA, USA) says the meters will be rolled out between 2016 and 2022 and allow residential and business customers to monitor their energy consumption accurately on a daily basis, instead of relying on estimated readings.

In total, GrDF’s smart gas meter project is intended to benefit as many as 11 million residential and business customers.

“Itron is honored to be a part of such a significant smart metering project in France,” said Marcel Regnier, the president of Itron’s global gas business unit. “As the largest smart gas deployment in the world, this project will be an example of excellence in smart metering and a model for future smart gas metering deployments around the world.”

“Itron has a long history in France and we are proud to provide these industry-leading smart gas meters to the largest natural gas provider in France,” he added. “We look forward to helping GrDF and its customers better manage gas resources.”
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